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Posts for category: Foot Issues

By Colorado Foot and Ankle
October 19, 2018
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Warts  

What Causes Warts?

Got foot warts? Nearly everyone will have a wart at some point in their lives. Warts are typically small, hard skin growths caused by an infection with humanpallilloma virus. Foot warts are treatable. Foot warts are among the most common dermatologic conditions podiatrists treat. Read on to learn about the causes of warts.

An HPV Infection

Common warts are caused by by an HPV infection. Over 100 types of HPV exist. Certain types of HPV infection cause cervical cancer. Some types of HPV infection cause foot warts, while others cause warts that appear on the face, neck, or hands. Of the 100 types of HPV, about 60 cause common warts on areas such as the hands or feet.

Skin-To-Skin Contact

Wart viruses are contagious. You can get foot warts from skin-to-skin contact with people who have warts. However, not all HPV strains are highly contagious. You can get the wart virus by touching an object that another person's wart touched, such as clothing, towels, shoes, or exercise equipment.


Breaks in Your Skin

HPV infects the top layer of skin and usually enters the body in an area of damaged or cut skin. Cuts from shaving can provide an avenue for infection. Getting a scrape can also bring on common warts. Foot warts are very common in swimmers whose feet are scratched by rough pool surfaces.

A Weak Immune System

In most cases, your immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates a wart. Someone with a weakened immune system is more vulnerable and therefore more likely to develop warts. Immune systems can be weakened by HIV or by immunosuppressant drugs used after organ transplants.


If you want to get rid of foot warts, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Many types of effective wart treatments are available. They include salicylic acid, cantharidin, cryotherapy, laser treatment, and surgery. Your podiatrist can help you get rid of foot warts once and for all!

By Colorado Foot and Ankle
August 14, 2018
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s important to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.

By Colorado Foot and Ankle
May 29, 2018
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Heel Pain  

Heel PainDoes your heel hurt but you don't know why? Although heel pain can occur for many reasons, it's often caused by a few common foot conditions. Dr. Eric Gessner, Dr. Bryan Groth, and Dr. Jacob Fassman of Colorado Foot and Ankle help Colorado Springs, CO, residents manage heel pain and other foot and ankle conditions.

Have you stepped on a hard object?

Heel pain doesn't necessarily mean that you have a serious foot condition. For example, it's surprising how much your heel can hurt if you happen to step on a rock, stray toy, or another hard object. After you step on the object, a painful bruise may form in the layer of fat that cushions the bottom of your foot. Known as metatarsalgia, or "stone" bruise, the condition can also occur if you run, jog, or walk in shoes that don't provide enough cushioning for your heel. In most cases, pain from a stone bruise goes away if you stay off your feet as much as possible for a week or two.

Did the pain occur after an accident?

An auto accident or jump or fall can cause a heel fracture. Although the pain may be severe, that's not always the case. If your pain appeared shortly after an injury, call your Colorado Springs foot doctor as soon as possible.

Is the pain worse when you first wake up?

You may have plantar fasciitis if you experience sharp, stabbing pains when you take your first steps in the morning. The foot condition occurs when the layer of connective tissue that connects your heels to your toes becomes inflamed. Other symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain after sitting or being inactive for a while or heel pain following exercise.

Do you feel the pain in the back of your heel?

Pain at the back of the heel can be caused by inflammation of your retrocalcaneal bursa or your Achilles tendon. In addition to pain, symptoms may include swelling and tenderness. Because retrocalcaneal bursitis and Achilles tendinitis have similar symptoms, it's important to schedule an appointment with your podiatrist to determine the cause of your pain.

End your heel pain with a visit to the foot doctor. Call our Colorado Springs, CO, podiatrists--Dr. Gessner, Dr. Groth, and Dr. Fassman of Colorado Foot and Ankle--at (719) 475-8080 to schedule your appointment.

By Colorado Foot and Ankle
March 20, 2018
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: plantar warts  

Are you suffering from a wart? Do you want to know what you can do to make it better? If so, then look no further. Your Colorado wartsSprings, CO, podiatrists Dr. Eric Gessner, Dr. Bryan Groth and Dr. Jacob Fassman can help you.

What is a wart?

You develop warts when a virus, called human papilloma virus (HPV), infects your foot. Warts are usually small growths on the skin and appear on the plantar side of your foot, which is essentially the bottom.

Plantar warts grow deep into the skin. Usually, this growth occurs slowly, with the wart starting small and becoming larger over time.

What types of warts are there?

The two types of warts are a solitary wart, which is when a single wart starts increasing in size and number, and mosaic wart, which are clusters of warts growing near each other.

What are some symptoms?

  • Plantar warts sometimes look like calluses, so be on the lookout for thickened skin tissue
  • Walking, standing, or squeezing the wart may cause pain
  • You'll notice tiny black dots on the surface of the wart

How would your Colorado Springs podiatrist diagnose and treat your wart?

  • Your doctor will examine your foot and look for the symptoms mentioned above
  • Your doctor may also treat your wart by surgically removing it
  • Oral and topical treatments, as well as laser therapy, cryotherapy, which is when your doctor freezes the wart, and acid treatments may be used to remove the wart
  • You shouldn't under any circumstance try to remove the wart yourself since more damage may occur
  • Be sure to follow your doctor's orders to avoid complications

For more information on removing plantar warts in the Colorado Springs, CO, you should call Colorado Foot and Ankle at (719) 475-8080 today!

By Colorado Foot and Ankle
January 05, 2018
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Diabetic Foot Care  

People with diabetes are prone to foot problems, often developing from a combination of poor circulation and nerve damage. Damage to the nerves in the legs and feet diminishes skin sensation, making it difficult to detect or notice pain or temperature changes. A minor sore or scrape on your foot may get infected simply because you don't know it is there. A decrease in blood flow makes it difficult for these injuries to heal. And when a wound isn't healing, it's at risk for infection. Left untreated, minor foot injuries can result in ulceration and even amputation.

Foot Care for Diabetics

Simple daily foot care can help prevent serious health problems associated with diabetes.

We recommend the following tips for keeping your feet healthy and preventing foot complications:

  • Wash feet daily. Keep feet clean with mild soap and lukewarm water, and dry thoroughly.
  • Moisturize. Moisturize daily to keep dry skin from cracking, and avoid putting lotion between your toes as this may cause infection.
  • Trim your toenails carefully. Cut straight across, avoiding the corners; visit our office for assistance
  • Never treat corns or calluses on your own. Visit your podiatrist for treatment.
  • Protect your feet from hot and cold.
  • Keep the blood flowing in your feet and legs. Elevate your feet when sitting, don't sit cross-legged, and stay active.
  • Inspect your feet every day. Check your feet for cuts, redness, swelling and nail problems. Contact our practice if you notice anything unusual, even the slightest change.
  • Avoid smoking. Smoking restricts blood flow in the feet
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes and never walk barefoot
  • Visit our practice for regular exams. Seeing a podiatrist at our office regularly can help prevent diabetic foot problems.

At our practice, we understand that living with diabetes can be challenging. Let's discuss simple ways you can reduce your risk of foot injuries. We'll work with you to create a treatment plan that fits your lifestyle and gets you back on your feet so you can enjoy the things you love. Remember to inspect your feet every day. If you detect an injury, no matter how small, come in for an exam right away.